Press "Enter" to skip to content

Research: Covid-19 appears most often in the afternoon – health news


In the study conducted by Candace McNaughton and colleagues of Vanderbilt University Medical Center in Nashville, USA, it was announced that people can secrete more corona viruses in the afternoon.

In The Guardian’s report, however, new studies that have not yet been reviewed by the referee have suggested that Covid-19 tests may be less likely to give false results when done in the afternoon compared to other hours of the day.

TEST OF 30 THOUSAND PEOPLE WAS EXAMINED

In the study conducted by examining the results of 30 thousand PCR-based tests carried out in Nashville region of the USA between March and June last year, the best time for the test result to be positive within 24 hours was determined as 14:00.

The scientists who conducted the study stated that the amount of virus transmission may increase in the first hours of the afternoon due to daily “circadian” (24-hour) fluctuations in how our immune cells interact with the coronavirus.

PREVIOUS RESEARCH HAS ALSO SHOWN

Previous studies of other viruses, such as influenza, have also shown that an individual’s symptoms and transmission of the virus to other people can vary over a 24-hour period.

Dr Rachel Edgar, a virologist at Imperial College London, who did not participate in the study but made a statement, said that other changes in our physiology, such as our nasal secretions, can also affect the amount of virus collected in nasal and throat swabs during a 24-hour day.

‘IF I WANTED TO HAVE THE MOST CORRECT TEST, I WOULD HAVE IT AFTER NOON’

Candace McNaughton at the head of the study, who said that in order to further develop the study, people should be infected with Covid-19 and then monitor whether their viral loads change at different times of the day, “If I wanted to have the most accurate Covid-19 test possible, I would have it done in the early afternoon.”


Be First to Comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *